Plotse toename van mouches volantes is een alarmsymptoom, ook zónder lichtflitsen

Translated title of the contribution: Acute onset of floaters, even without flashes, is an urgent ophthalmic warning sign

Jennifer S N Verhoekx, Koen A van Overdam, Olta Gishti, Redmer van Leeuwen, Niels Crama

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Acute onset of floaters is most likely caused by a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). A PVD can lead to a retinal tear and subsequently to a retinal detachment with permanent vision loss if left untreated. A patient who presents to a primary care physician with acute onset of floaters, in the absence flashes or visual field loss, is often referred to an ophthalmologist without urgency. In the current Dutch general practitioners standard, acute onset or increase of floaters, without flashes or visual loss, is not included as a reason for urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Patients who present with acute onset of floaters without flashes have a 14-23% risk of having a retinal tear. Risk factors for developing a retinal tear are high myopia, trauma, cataract surgery, or a retinal tear or retinal detachment in the past medical or family history. Patients with acute onset of floaters should be triaged for urgent ophthalmologic assessment.

Translated title of the contributionAcute onset of floaters, even without flashes, is an urgent ophthalmic warning sign
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)D5850
JournalNederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde
Volume165
Publication statusPublished - 21 Oct 2021

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